Reblogged from rojerk

spideretc:

MEDICINE COMIC #1

BUY IT NOW: http://pricetapes.storenvy.com/collections/236190-all-products/products/9569161-medicine-comic-1

DEBUTING AT SPX

from the people who brought you rain comic #1, pixar’s cars #1, xmas comic #1, cop comic #1, basketball comic #1, butler comic #1 (and so on and so forth) comes medicine comic #1, a comic about medicine. topics include: taking medicine, giving medicine, looking at medicine, and beyond! 
MEDICINE COMIC #1 
24 pages, risograph printed, featuring the work of michael deforge, patrick kyle, and mickey zacchilli 
EDITION OF 350 
SEPTEMBER 2014

$5+s&h

BUY IT NOW: http://pricetapes.storenvy.com/collections/236190-all-products/products/9569161-medicine-comic-1

Reblogged from ☯sclr☯
mrsdentonorahippo:

Even creepy stuffed ones.

mrsdentonorahippo:

Even creepy stuffed ones.

Reblogged from The True Bob Files
devil of oslo

devil of oslo

constellation-funk:

futureoffilm:

Data From a Century of Cinema Reveals How Movies Have Evolved

In a 2010 paper, Cutting argued that the pattern of shot durations over the course of a movie has changed over the years in a way that makes movies mesh better with the natural fluctuations in human attention. Every new shot requires the viewer to re-orient their attention, Cutting says. A movie with only short takes would demand too much of viewers’ attention. A movie with only long cuts might cause people’s minds to wander. The right mix makes it more likely that an audience will stay engaged and lose themselves in the movie, Cutting says. (The Empire Strikes Back, for example, accomplished this with its rhythm of short-take action sequences separated by periods of relative calm). Not everyone agrees with Cutting’s analysis, and the paper has provoked a lively discussion among film scholars.

constellation-funk:

futureoffilm:

Data From a Century of Cinema Reveals How Movies Have Evolved

In a 2010 paper, Cutting argued that the pattern of shot durations over the course of a movie has changed over the years in a way that makes movies mesh better with the natural fluctuations in human attention. Every new shot requires the viewer to re-orient their attention, Cutting says. A movie with only short takes would demand too much of viewers’ attention. A movie with only long cuts might cause people’s minds to wander. The right mix makes it more likely that an audience will stay engaged and lose themselves in the movie, Cutting says. (The Empire Strikes Back, for example, accomplished this with its rhythm of short-take action sequences separated by periods of relative calm). Not everyone agrees with Cutting’s analysis, and the paper has provoked a lively discussion among film scholars.

Reblogged from Constellation Funk
I predict that in 2050, we’ll look back at the first 20 years of the web and shake our heads. The craptacular design! The hallucinogenic business models! The privacy nightmares! All because entrepreneurs convinced themselves that they couldn’t do what inventors have done for centuries: Charge people a fair price for things they want.

Three years ago, Wired’s Clive Thompson, who has since explored the unsuspected ways in which the web is making us smarter, made a heartening case for the backlash against the malady that is online advertising. Today, more and more, one has hope that Thompson will end up right.

(HT @EthanZ)

Reblogged from Explore
corrumpo:

Rita Gomes.

corrumpo:

Rita Gomes.

Reblogged from CORRUMPO